Shanghai Club (ROMAN) (French Edition)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Shanghai Club (ROMAN) (French Edition) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Shanghai Club (ROMAN) (French Edition) book. Happy reading Shanghai Club (ROMAN) (French Edition) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Shanghai Club (ROMAN) (French Edition) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Shanghai Club (ROMAN) (French Edition) Pocket Guide.

Champagne-Lorraine : La sculpture flamboyante Feb Get it by Tuesday, Jul 09 Only 1 left in stock. Rouergue Languedoc flamboyants Mar Les croix du Massif Central Jan Auvergne Bourbonnais Forez flamboyants Nov Auvergne: Terre romane Jan La sculpture flamboyante en Normandie et Ile-de-France Feb Les grands imagiers dOccident: La sculpture flamboyante Sculpture et imagiers Jan More Information.

Anything else? Provide feedback about this page. Back to top. Get to Know Us. Amazon Music Stream millions of songs. Audible Download Audiobooks. DPReview Digital Photography. To ask other readers questions about Shanghai Redemption , please sign up. I understand this is the ninth Inspector Chen novel, however, in English I can only find eight all of which I have read.

Does anyone know if this novel will be published in English? It looks as though it was translated into French, I presume from English? Francesca Graneri Original title Shanghai Redemption See 2 questions about Shanghai Redemption…. Lists with This Book.


  • Shanghai Redemption!
  • H for History.
  • CITY HOTEL SHANGHAI $73 ($̶1̶1̶8̶) - Updated Prices & Reviews - China - TripAdvisor.
  • The Peninsula Shanghai.
  • Luxury Hotels and Resorts | Bvlgari Hotels & Resorts!
  • Fireman Max – The Perfect Halloween Costume (Book 5: The Adventures of Fireman Max Series - Stories for Kids Ages 4-8);

Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Oct 22, Denise Mullins rated it it was ok. While this book started off quite sluggishly and took a while for this reader to get into the poetic prose and languid pacing, it eventually improved to sustain interest. It was thought-provoking to ponder the chaos and corruption faced by citizens trapped in an "enlightened" communist regime.

Thus the setting's ambiance proved a compelling and fascinating element. Unfortunately, between the similarity of some names, titles, and all-too-frequent shifting locales, the enjoyment of following the m While this book started off quite sluggishly and took a while for this reader to get into the poetic prose and languid pacing, it eventually improved to sustain interest.

Unfortunately, between the similarity of some names, titles, and all-too-frequent shifting locales, the enjoyment of following the meandering plot became annoying. Moreover, the too frequent inclusion of poetic quotes and Chinese proverbs grew old. The book morphed from a police mystery with social implications into a fortune cookie nightmare. Most disappointing was the ending that seemed haphazardly cobbled together and left this reader wondering about the fate of several key characters. Oct 30, Monica rated it liked it Shelves: asian , china , crime-and-or-evil.

It's a better book than the last one in the series. The plot is pretty much straight out of recent headlines from China - Bo Xi Lai, the dead pigs in the river in Shanghai, official corruption, but it is still fairly well done. The most interesting things in the book deal with the food, the cemetery rituals in Suzhou, and the decline of the Suzhou opera.

The minor characters are more interesting than Chen, who is is still comparatively flat, and the poetry is more of a distraction than a revelati It's a better book than the last one in the series. The minor characters are more interesting than Chen, who is is still comparatively flat, and the poetry is more of a distraction than a revelation. May 26, Laura rated it liked it Shelves: audio-books , read , roman-noir , suspense-thriller , chinese-literature. From BBC Radio 4 - Drama: Inspector Chen finds himself "promoted" sideways from the Shanghai Police Bureau before narrowly escaping a night-club trap and exposing a web of financial and sexual corruption.

Dramatised by John Harvey. They have sold over 1 million copies and been translated into 20 langauges. View 2 comments. Jul 21, Lisabet Sarai rated it liked it. I've read several other books in this series, and generally find the author's portrayal of modern China to be riveting. Since my last foray into his work, though, I've actually visited Shanghai briefly. On the one hand, I enjoyed the experience of recognizing some of the places he describes.

On the other, I have become a bit tired of his relentlessly negative view of Chinese political and social reality. Perhaps his view is more accurate than mine, but one always should question the perceptions I've read several other books in this series, and generally find the author's portrayal of modern China to be riveting. Perhaps his view is more accurate than mine, but one always should question the perceptions of a deliberate expatriate.

While I was reading the book, I could hardly put it down. Still, when I'd finished, I felt more disappointment than satisfaction. Of course, the plot isn't really the point in these stories, but still, I'd like something more than just China-bashing. Oct 26, Herzog rated it liked it Shelves: series , mystery. This book held so much promise. I'm a big fan of this series and it appeared as if all of the elements were in place for a big payoff, but, in the end, poof?

We have Chen in a new position. We have the whole host of characters - his mother unresolved , Yu, Mr. Gu, White Cloud, Melong, Peqin and in the end they're really all left hanging. I guess we have a resolution in the epilogue, but it is most unsatisfying given the intensity of the book and the large themes dealt with. I feel letdown. Aug 29, CarolineFromConcord rated it it was ok. Sloppy, lazy plotting cannot be redeemed by exotic locales. The author is a Chinese translator and poet who now lives in the US.

He writes mostly about Shanghai. His stories rely on quotes from both Chinese- and English-language poets, which would be nice in moderation but are overdone. What is worse is the laziness of the writing. The book's first section is all about a woman in another city who hires ex-chief inspector Chen Cao to spy on a woman in Shanghai.

When he returns to Shanghai from th Sloppy, lazy plotting cannot be redeemed by exotic locales. When he returns to Shanghai from the suburb, this work is not mentioned once as Chen starts investigating the cases he had right before his worrisome reassignment. And when he meets the woman again, he doesn't even acknowledge that he was supposed to do something for her, instead asking her to investigate something for him.

And there are many other signs that the author barely read over his work.


  1. Shipwrecks of Madagascar.
  2. Luxury Hotels and Resorts;
  3. Genshiken: Second Season Vol. 1.
  4. People offer him places to hide and other help that is never referenced again. He climbs the stairs to a second floor opera club with a beaded curtain for a door and hears no sound as he approaches, even though when he is in the room, he says that students are playing instruments. Also, the many nefarious doings of high-level Communist Party cadres are not tied together at the end. The ending sort of dribbles off a cliff when enough words have been written to satisfy the publisher and pay the electric bill. Read the first couple books in this series, and then forget about it.

    Apr 20, Kevin Vrieze rated it it was amazing Shelves: shanghai-redemption. Shanghai Redemption is one of the most complex mysteries I've read in some time. The plot lines are quite intense and very indirect. This aspect of literature with an Asian flavor has always been great fun. Chen is, himself, being hunted while trying to solve couple of cases before dealing with his promotion out of the Shanghai Police.

    Fighting against the hidden enemy while trying to fulfill his code of justice and honor proves a captivating story. This story very much fits with the sequence beg Shanghai Redemption is one of the most complex mysteries I've read in some time. This story very much fits with the sequence begun in Enigma of China 8 in the Inspector Chen Cao series , but stands well enough on its own.

    The interplay of technology-internet, social media, flash drives, and the standard threads of politics and philosophy from much older eras is fascinating. That said, the technology does not interfere with a great story. The literary content of this story is equal, in its way to anything Umberto Eco has done. They are all important to understand the full sense of what happens.

    The range of reference is amazing. From Eliot to ancient Chinese poets. For me the most striking was the, again indirect, reference to Blake's Tiger which, as it turns out, is the pivot for understanding the key to resolution of the plot against Chen as well as the case he is investigating. Blake would have been delighted as would Frye in the usage of the lines and reference. The references and discussion of food in the story are a gem not to be missed. I can tell you the Green Tea Shrimp is mouth-watering. As the mystery itself goes Chen does well on his own against amazing difficulties.

    The more remarkable aspect of this story as well as 8 is the part friends and associates play in his work. This makes for great character development and provides a sense of social fabric one does not often see in contemporary mysteries. Peiquin is amazing in her work on the net. Melong is equally intriguing.

    Our Collection

    Significant and remarkably understated are the roles the female characters play in the story. Each, in their own way, provides a thread that contributes notably to the fabric of the story. All this put together made me delighted with the decision to change my reading list and move this one up to read immediately after Enigma of China. It is a great story in a great series. There is the obscure, and somewhat unresolved, status of Chen at the end which is different from Western story lines.

    That said, I can't wait to see where the next book in this series takes him and all around him. Definitely worth putting on the "must read" list.

    Shanghai's Best Bars! Drink in a jacuzzi on a rooftop!

    First Sentence: April is a cruel month, if not the cruelest. Technically, Chen is in charge of a corruption case against a powerful Party figure. There are many re First Sentence: April is a cruel month, if not the cruelest. There are many reasons to read a book by Qiu Xiaolong, but one is how much one learns about a place, history, culture and people many of us will never visit. Even the occasional awkwardness of the dialogue remind us that this is not a translation, but written by someone for whom Chinese his first language, which simply reinforces the sense of place.

    Qiun ordered plain noodles with peeled shrimp friend with Dragon Well tea leaves, in across-the-bridge style. He also makes learning about Chinese history and tradition fascinating, including that of the ernai, who are similar to concubines but hold a different status and relationship. Chen is a wonderful character.

    He is ethical, moral and loyal to his family and friends. He immediately protects someone who is innocent Just when one thinks Chen truly is paranoid and we are all being led astray, there is a powerful twist that ratchets up the suspense. The ending is very satisfactory and yet elicits an intriguing sense of future uncertainty for Chen, which is always fun. Shanghai Redemption is book 9 in the Inspector Chen Cao series. This book was originally written in English, although the author was born in Shanghai in and lived in China until , when he went to study to the United States.

    Inspector Chen is a policeman in modern Shanghai, an honest man amid rampant corruption. Now he has been "demoted" to a job that will get him away from his police duties. Somebody high up in the government wants to get rid of him permanently, if possible. The beauty of Qiu Xiaolong's Inspector Chen books is not only that the mysteries are so, so good, but that we get a view of modern China that feels as if you're reading a modern history book.

    And also, the books are full of ancient China history and literature, of quotes and beautiful poems. For me, these series perfectly combine a view of modern China but also of it's traditions. Another part that I love is the description of the food, it just makes you imagine yourself in front of a big bowl of noodles!

    Oct 07, Dan Downing rated it really liked it. The writing here feels like classic Chinese translated into English. Not so. Qiu Xiaolong, while born in Shanghai, lives in St. Louis where he writes and translates.

    vpn567706038.softether.net/roi-power-the-step-by-step-guide.php

    shanghai club roman french edition Manual

    When we enter China through the 3rd person narrator, we follow Chen Cao, who has just been relieved of his duties as Chief Inspector of Special Investigations, and given a promotion to a non-police position. He recognizes that in China this is a harbinger of disaster. As Chen fills his duty as a filial son by tending to the restoratio The writing here feels like classic Chinese translated into English. As Chen fills his duty as a filial son by tending to the restoration of his father's grave while he tries to find out what he has done to earn such disfavor from 'the Higher Ups', we are given a tour of today's China, its political make-up, its food and its fascination with 'sayings' both ancient and recent.

    Not so much a mystery as an adventure, we are here to enjoy the tone, observe the streets and customs, and get a feel for the problems faced by people in a quickly and profoundly changing society. Oct 18, Paul DiBara rated it really liked it. Inspector Chen at his most cynical and paranoid, justifiably so as it turns out. The book relies and builds upon relationships established and developed in earlier stories.

    As a result there is less growth among the supporting characters. On the other hand Chen has to rely on his friends and associates more than ever. For most of the book Chen, and the reader, is confused and befuddled by both the change in his position and seemingly unrelated events that seem somehow to be connected to his situa Inspector Chen at his most cynical and paranoid, justifiably so as it turns out. For most of the book Chen, and the reader, is confused and befuddled by both the change in his position and seemingly unrelated events that seem somehow to be connected to his situation.

    Also, people surrounding Chen begin suffering some fatally simply because of their association with the Inspector. It is not until the very end of the book before Chen, with critical help from friends, that he is able to patch together a bizarre scenario to explain it all. Oct 11, Kay rated it it was amazing. Inspector Chen Cao just gets better and better at investigation and skirting catastrophe and keeps me keen with his quotes from Chinese poetry and his larding of T. Eliot, my favorite poet in English, into the pages. The problem of the novel, Chen's comedown and the political mess he is in and the specters chasing him and just missing blowing him up more than once, is a plot that goes on and on but I didn't mind because of the rich Chinese life that so realistically spreads out on the pages.

    Y Inspector Chen Cao just gets better and better at investigation and skirting catastrophe and keeps me keen with his quotes from Chinese poetry and his larding of T. Yes, based on a real Chinese scandal, the book gives Westerners some insight into the dark alleys if Chinese politics and policing. Not to mention the food and the culture and women's lives!

    City Hotel Shanghai

    Richness in a deceptively simple story. More Chen Cao, please. Dec 11, Lisa Brunette rated it it was amazing. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review, and the author is a former colleague. This is a wonderful continuation of Inspector Chen's career arc, providing a deeper, darker dive into China's Communist Party politics. The plot is subtle, complex, and as always, suffused with lovely, poetic moments. These come when the Inspector and his I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review, and the author is a former colleague.

    These come when the Inspector and his allies quote actual poetry, and they also occur in the author's gorgeous descriptive prose. I highly recommend this series as a unique and powerful intersection of contemporary Chinese politics, English and Chinese literature, and police procedural.

    Dec 15, Nlindgren rated it did not like it. I would have given the book two stars, but its cardinal sin is the utter dullness of it. The book pretends to start 60 pages in, but is actually a treatise on poetry masquerading as a cop story. The characters do a whole lot of nothing, and there's a conspiracy that amounts to something, maybe.

    Shanghai EDITION Hotel Opens

    I'm not sure. A complete waste of time, could have been interesting too. Apr 15, Colleen rated it liked it Shelves: mystery. All the Inspector Chen books are entertaining and are fascinating especially because of the poetry that Chen quotes often.

    A Night Out in the Shanghai Badlands with Paul French

    This book is so real and current that I found it somewhat depressing, a bit too close to home as so many of the issues are relevant in South Africa at present as well. Oct 02, Gary Van Cott rated it liked it. I liked this book a bit less than the preceding ones. At the beginning it felt like I had missed a book when Chen was removed from his position.

    It had many of the familiar characters from the previous books but the plot didn't really engage my interest. Sep 23, Karen rated it liked it Shelves: mysteries. I liked the poetry quotes. The mystery had some complicated details and some of the case information was repeated unnecessarily. Aug 07, Linden rated it liked it. A great police procedural series set in Shanghai which offers insights into modern Chinese society.


    1. Profile Menu.
    2. Shanghai EDITION Hotel Opens.
    3. Not registered yet? Signing up is easy!.
    4. Le guide pratique de lépargne et du crédit (French Edition).
    5. Nightlife Tag | SmartShanghai?
    6. Not quite as compelling as the earlier books but it's always fun to "visit" Inspector Chen. Light read - good for traveling. Dec 27, Marthe Bijman rated it liked it. It has been said that the problem with poetry is that whatever poem you come up with, due to the limitations of the techniques at your disposal and the sheer devilish difficulty of writing, your poems will always fall short.

      The very best poem is always the poem that is yet to be written. Add copious amounts of poetry to a detective novel and what do you get? A damn difficult novel. Make that Chinese poetry and a Chinese detective and it gets incrementally worse. That is the problem with Shangha It has been said that the problem with poetry is that whatever poem you come up with, due to the limitations of the techniques at your disposal and the sheer devilish difficulty of writing, your poems will always fall short. How can one make sense of such an oddity, by the usual standards of the crime fiction genre?

      Bear in mind that it is a best-selling, hugely popular oddity. The clues are in the poems Drawing on his love of poetry, Qiu habitually includes poetry in his detective novels. The Chinese poetry just baffled me. The quoted poems are not the only mentions of poetry. Eliot no less! The ex-chief inspector, annoyed with the impossible poet within himself, started tapping on his laptop sitting on the coffee table. The classical poems of course contain imagery of sadness, melancholy, beauty, neglect, the end-of-season-blues, and lost and neglected love.

      There are 6 mentions of lakes, 6 of a beautiful, sad woman, 7 of trees and falling leaves, 5 of the moon and stars and 4 each of birds, wine and wind. Difficulties with understanding the novel I really enjoyed the novel but found some aspects frustrating. Qiu puts many barriers in the way of the non-Chinese reader. For one, the characters speak in poetry quotes, preach and declaim to one another. Lastly, I found the names of the characters very frustrating. They all sound the same to me. Will he stop working for the police and become a private investigator for real?

      There has not been another Inspector Chen novel after book 9, published in Jul 01, Shuriu rated it liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In ancient China, qingguan meant incorruptible officials, those rare, practically nonexistent officials who were not the product of the system, rather an aberration of it. Consequently, they frequently got into trouble.

      In the past, farmers there raised only a few pigs, perhaps five or six per family. Pig farming is now a matter of mass production. There are thousands of them, maybe even more, crammed together. They are now raised on chemical feed and whatnot. So naturally there are more sick or dead pigs in the picture.

      Some 'entrepreneurs' saw an opportunity there.